Drink Coke and eat one less Cookie?

Have you seen the new 2 minute ad by Coca-Cola?  The premise is that they are not contributing to the obesity epidemic, but rather helping to fight obesity by offering low-calorie diet sodas and smaller cans (at a higher price)!

Never mind that research has shown that diet soda is dangerous, linking it to heart disease, bone losskidney disease, and stroke, not to mention weight gain and obesity! (Even more references here and here).

But, you have to give Coca-Cola credit for getting out ahead of the issue and trying to protect their business.  (It reminds me of when the cigarette manufactures came out with low tar cigarettes.)  Coke’s major premise is that if you consume more calories than you burn, you will gain weight, regardless of whether those calories come from chocolate cake, sugary drinks or even mom’s home cooking.  They even encourage us to get more exercise to burn off those excess calories.  All good advise.

As sugar, aspartame and other artificial sweeteners are legal products, I am not in favor of the government dictating what we can and can’t eat (ha, they do it all the time through the FDA, but that’s a topic for another day)!  But as we move toward the government paying for our health care, and our health is directly related to what we consume, will the government take it upon themselves to control what we eat and drink?  Sugared sodas, high fat desserts, alcohol, caffeine???

 

Comments

  1. It’s all a bit of a loaded issue. No easy answers I am afraid.

  2. This is happening in some areas already. I do not have a fully formed opinion one way or another on this one but wouldn’t it seem outlawing larger sized drinks in New York a way of the government dictating what is healthy for us?
    It goes along the same lines of outlawing cigarettes in public. They set laws like these by claiming they are protecting the public good.

    • But where does personal responsibility come in?

      • Thats the bigger issue. By the government forcing the issue, we no longer have need to accept personal responsibility. In a perfect world we would all know and accept responsibility for our actions at every level. But our world is far from perfect. Too often the easy way out is the option of least resistance.

        Letting someone else decide what is best for us means one less decision we have make in our daily lives. I personally do prefer the choice of personal choice.

  3. Just because it’s low calorie doesn’t mean it’s healthy.

  4. Grace,

    I honestly have to admit I have not seen the commercial, I don’t watch much TV. I don’t like the idea though because both are bad for you and can pass on the promoting such an idea.

    Jenn

  5. I’m all for putting higher taxes on high-calorie junk foods with no nutritional benefit. I’m also for looking for ways to better educate people on why they shouldn’t be slogging down gallons of soda a day (I drink mostly water.) Now, if only Mountain Dew would come out with a campaign on how poisonous their stuff is… nah, that’s wouldn’t curb my hubby’s cravings at all.

  6. Isn’t is funny that Coke is jumping on the campaign that if you burn more calories then you ingest while drinkig coke it is somehow healthier for you?? I am not one to drink so much soda. I enjoy water much more and find it much more refresing than sugar ladden soda. 🙂

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